Arpeggiating Basic Chord Forms

What's an Arpeggio? An arpeggio is created when you play a chord's tones, broken style, one after the other, rather than all at once. Typically, but not always, we let all notes ring as long as they can. This creates a cascading type effect. There are several benefits to arpeggiating chord forms. It helps to more clearly hear if every string that is supposed to be heard is ringing clearly. It is a common accompaniment technique. Next to strumming it is the most common way to play accompaniment. The ways you could arpeggiate a chord are boundless. Here are some examples using chords you are already familiar with.


Using the chord G Major.

Arpeggiated

 

Slow at first then faster once you master


Using the chord A Minor.

Arpeggiated.

 

Slowly at first  then faster once you master


Using the chord C Major.

Arpeggiated.

 


Slowly at first  then faster once you master


Using the chord D Major.

Arpeggiated.

 

Slowly at first  then faster once you master


Using the chord E Minor.

Arpeggiated.

 

Slowly at first    then faster once you master

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